arv Business plan

INTERVIEW WITH ARV

Name?

Maikel Tawadros

Age?

34

Background?

Maikel Tawadros (MT): My background is as a designer. I graduated from Copenhagen Academy of Fashion Design in January 2012 and worked for a variety of brands both before and after graduating as a designer.

I lived in Paris between 2007-2009 while working for the Danish Fashion brand Annhagen.

Design Philosophy?

MT: arv knows that people are at their best without any restrictions.

These are garments that are cool, sustainable, sophisticated, and made for everyone.

What convinced you to start your own brand?

MT:After graduating, I had a strong desire to bring my vision and aesthetic to the Danish fashion scene.

My look was a bit more edgy than what other designers were doing at the time. My shows had a darker approach; that was very personal to me. I wanted people, the press, and my customers to really understand me and my design aesthetic.

What production qualities are found in your designs, and what characterises your products?

MT: I’m a big fan of using natural materials such as organic cotton, deadstock cotton/wool fabrics, upcycled denim, and 100% certified and traceable fox and mink furs from Saga Furs.

My products are characterized by their ”Copenhagen-spirit.” The products appeal to many, but people manage to style and use the pieces in so many cool ways; they really make it their own. My organic cotton crew necks always have a bold, easily recognizable print.

Both my t-shirts and shirts have been worn by a wide range of artists within the music industry as well as many others, both men and women.

How do you consider sustainability in your collections?

MT: As much as possible, everything from my collections is rendered in sustainable fabrics, including organic cotton, deadstock fabrics and yarns, upcycled denim and redone/reworked existing styles.

The quality of my chosen fabrics is crucial when manufacturing these long-lasting styles, and the quality of the final products is of the utmost importance. My suppliers in Europe – Portugal, Poland, Bulgaria, and Denmark – are all small manufacturers with either one person or small teams with approximately 10-15 adult employees working under EU conditions, which are both responsible and ethical.

When possible I work with local artisans such as local furriers, milliners, tailors, and artists in order to have a hands-on-approach in developing my drops. It’s important for me to develop styles that are long-lasting. I also want to minimize transport expenses and do something good for our planet when it comes to pollution.

It’s also vital to me that I use that fantastic Danish craftsmanship.

What have happened with your brand since you participated in Magasin Du Nord Fashion Prize the first time?

MT: Since Magasin du Nord Fashion Prize in 2015 – I continued to developpe my style, my collections, my mind, optimise and took the best I learned from the whole experience including my mentor back then, Peter Ingwersen.

But in February 2017 I went down with stress due to too much work, production difficulties, clients that didn’t pay their invoices which caused financial problems in my small company which resulted in a mental break down.

I had to listen to my body and take a break to recover and figure out if this was actually worth fighting for. I was burned out! Then in May 2018 my spark came back, I was inspired again, I was filled with a new fresh energy. I wanted to make clothes again. I can’t run from my passion for creating beautiful clothes.

But I was determined to do it in a different way with a completely different setup. I didn’t want to design and produce the typical 2 seasons with 2 collections. Instead I wanted to create a cool sustainable unisex wardrobe with good commercial styles that still has the essence of Maikel Tawadros and comes in drops throughout the seasons.

It was extremely important for me to create a brand that is 100% me but I didn’t want to name the the new brand my name like last time because this is a different project, a new me with an eye for sustainability.

The name arv came into mind because I wanted to take the best clothing/styles from the past and translate them into new cool styles.

How do you stand out from the crowd in 2020?

MT: Due to my ups and downs, regaining the passion and energy to start a new brand forced me to think differently when it comes to creating collections. Times are changing and we have to adapt to the new situations going on in the world such as the Covid-19 outbreak, climate change, and the consumer focus on sustainability and social responsibility. arv stands out in the crowd in 2020 by creating small, sustainable, and socially responsible clothes wherein 90% of what we produce is made within the EU and even more locally.

We need to stop overproduction in the fashion industry since it’s one of the most polluting industries in the world.

At arv, we produce small quantities (30-50 pieces) and when a style is sold out, it’s gone forever. My philosophy is to make people consider how they consume; we don’t need to buy a new jacket, bag, and knit every season. It’s an outdated way of thinking. Instead, I hold to the maxim: “quality over quantity”.

Astrid Andersen Diary

INTERVIEW WITH ASTRID ANDERSEN

 

Astrid Andersen (AA): Please tell how you’re preparing yourself for the jury presentations?

AA: Im taking time to reflect on what is actually important to me as Im sure that has to be the center of the presentation when also talking about where you want the brand to go in the future. Its really important to me that my intentions and passion around my brand is communicated clearly because I value that as my biggest asset.

 

 Is there one jury member you’re particular excited to meet?

AA: Every time anyone takes the time to listen to your journey and give you feedback based on their own experiences its extremely valuable and I consider mysef very lucky to have this opportunity right at this moment in time to have this conversation with the jury members.

 

Design, sustainability or business – how do you plan to priorities your efforts?

AA: Design is my core passion. Creating fashion that inspires the customer and contributing to an industry that has to stay inspirational in order to be sustainable – we need to buy better and less and that consumer behavior is driven by the essence of fashion.

 

What would be the first sentence you say at the presentation?

AA: Hi my name is Astrid.

Sur Le Chemin Business plan

INTERVIEW WITH SUR LE CHEMIN 

How do you consider sustainability in your collections?

Sur Le Chemin (SLC): At sur le chemin we strive to slow down the pace in today’s fashion industry, creating clothing that are timeless and will survive over time.

We do not produce the traditional seasonal 2, 4 or even more collections a year, but try to find a new way to work within an industry that for the last decades have ended up having a speed that is no longer sustainable.

This meaning that we are developing a base of essentials, that consists of styles such as the classic white shirt, t-shirts and merino knits. Around this base, we build the collection piece by piece – presenting the different styles to the market on a regular basis throughout the year(s).

Working this way we are able to be more true to season, have close to no overproduction and avoid sales. Furthermore, all this leads to less overconsumption.

 

We strive to use sustainably sourced fabrics as much as possible, such as GOTS certified organic cotton, re-cycled cashmere wool and Tencel.

If we fail to find a sustainable alternative in the wanted quality, we will always choose a high-quality material. This is because we believe that a product that lasts a long time at all times is the most sustainable choice.

 

What have happened with your brand since you participated in Magasin du Nord Fashion Prize the first time?

SLC: After participating in 2014 the brand Armoire officielle gained acknowledgement and growth for the seasons to come. This resulting in a womens line as well as major wholesale clients such as Steven Allan in the US for the SS17 collection.

As part of this development the Armoire officielle store opened in Copenhagen August 2016. However – during these months the brand was moving further and further away from the original principles of slownessand more towards the traditional structures of the industry, I initially wanted to move away from. Facing this the decision to re-think the brand was made In December 2016, and all activities were paused.

As part of this process I teamed up with two new partners; Ed Renner (Previous Managing Director, Triumph International) and Lene Renner (Previous KØS, Museum of Art in public spaces), sharing a common vision where slowness and a new way of thinking about a fashion brand were the basis for further development.

 

The brand re-launched in May 2017, under the name sur le chemin.

How do you stand out from the crowd in 2020?

SLC: By presenting a new business platform, combining brand, store and design studio. These three are all equally important in terms of dialogue with end consumers, as well as a sustainable business model.

 

What is the most important knowledge you have gained as a designer/brand so far in 2020?

SLC: The first half of 2020 has been characterised by Covid19 and the challenges it has brought. When Denmark started to lock down, it was obvious quite early that sur le chemin did not have the same challenges that most other brands had. We did not experience any crucial delays of production, no season collection not to be sold or cancelled orders.

To experience our business model being relatively stable and easy to adapt to the situation during this period has been truly uplifting.

 

What can the Magasin du Nord Fashion Prize do for you if you win in 2020?

SLC: Winning the Magasin du Nord Fashion Prize will first and foremost be an important acknowledgement of our design philosophy. It will create greater visibility, greater financial stability and strengthen the journey we are already on. Participating expands our network and it will hopefully create a foundation for new exciting collaborations in the time to come

mfpen Diary

INTERVIEW WITH MFPEN 

Could you please describe your studio?

Sigurd Bank (SB): Based in outer Nørrebro, It is in the extension of the artist Simon Starling’s studio. I rent the backspace of the studio space.

A bit messy, fabric swatches everywhere as I constantly source and buy deadstock fabrics.

Good atmosphere and great music.

How would the daily routine look like at your studio?

SB: Come in at 10, listen to the Do you! Breakfast show on NTS radio, lunch around 12:30 with the whole studio, going home between 5 and 6.

Do you have a guilty pleasure (snack, music, etc)?

SB: I like to drink a can of coca cola in the afternoon.

There is always music playing in the office.

What has happened with your work routines during the pandemic?

SB: Nothing actually, except for less travelling and lots of zoom calls.

How do you get inspired at the moment?

SB: By the fabrics I find which is all deadstock, they determine how my collections are built up.

I am trying to go a year without flying, so travel is a no go.

If I have time I try to watch some movies, at the moment I am super drawn to the popular culture of my early teen years.

Just watched Vanilla Sky again, lol.

What’s usually the starting point of your design process?

SB: There’s no starting point, it’s a constant process.

Describe your collection this season in 5 words?

SB: Deadstock, suiting, relaxed and informal formal.

Sur Le Chemin Business plan

INTERVIEW WITH SUR LE CHEMIN 

Name

Kjetil Aas

Brand: sur le chemin.

 

Age

SLC: 43.

 

Background

SLC: Co-founder, sur le chemin (previous Armoire officielle).

Head of Design, Norse Projects.

Designer, Matinique.

Design Assistant, Won Hundred.

MA Menswear,  Design School of Kolding.

History of Art, University in Oslo.

 

Design philosophy?

SLC: The sur le chemin design philosophy considers all aspects of the garment made, including aesthetics, comfort and wearability. Words such as modernity, functionality and simplicity have always been of importance for me in the process of designing. It is my vision to create longlasting wardrobe favourites.

What convinced you to start your own brand?

SLC: Leaving Norse Projects in 2011, it was important to me to find a foothold in the fashion industry, where I could still see myself in 30 years time.

Having been a part of the industry since 2005 it became more and more clear to me what needed to be changed, being able to contribute to the shift towards a more sustainable industry. So when the opportunity arose, the development of what is now sur le chemin began.

 

What production qualities are found in your designs, and what characterizes your products?

SLC: All sur le chemin brand products are made in Europe, in a close relationship with our manufactures. One of our strengths is the possibility to produce at a very low minimum. This gives flexibility in the supply chain and at the same time allows us to avoid overproduction.

A sur le chemin brand product is often subtle in its design, focusing on the fabric and details of the style. It is relevant, regardless of trends. Making it worth re-using and in the end being re-cycled.

mfpen Diary

INTERVIEW WITH MFPEN 

Designer:
Sigurd Bank, 33 years.

Background:
Sigurd Bank (SB): Educated and specialised in textile production and sourcing with work experience from various commercial brands handling design as well as product developing and production processes. This beca- me the starting point for wanting to create a more responsible and less wasteful practice in an industry that is more often driven by finan- cial reasoning. Following mfpen was established in 2016.

Design philosophy
SB: My design philosophy is to create honest and ready-to-wear collec- tions centered around luxurious deadstock fabrics with a Modernist approach to details. Shapes are inspired by iconic garments, classic basics and pre-loved items, always focussing on wearability and longevity. The pieces are meant to be worn and made to last. Therefore, consistently made with an emphasis on good craftsmanship and relaxed silhouettes as the core aesthetic anchor for mfpen. Even though most garments are based on traditional men’s tailoring, I don’t consider our clothing to be gendered, hence our choice in styling to include women.

Undeniably, the sincere aesthetic of mfpen is also distinguished by our production structure due to limitation in fabric availability. I make a big effort to find luxurious deadstock textiles. Woven gar- ments, such as coats, shirts and trousers, are cut from the finest Italian and Portuguese fabrics and sewn within Europe to minimize transportation and make potential visits for QC and CSR easier.

What convinced you to start your own brand?

SB: To be frank, the lack of voluminous silhouettes with a clean aesthetic in Danish menswear brands along with the desire for clothing with proper values, which has evolved into the current and perhaps obsessive seeking of luxurious surplus fabrics, in order to utilize the resources that already exist.

What production qualities are found in your designs, and what characterizes your products?

SB: First and foremost, as I also mentioned above, the designs are highly influenced by the deadstock fabrics we find. It is a symbiotic process where one impacts the other. We produce all our garments in Europe and all our woven fabrics are Italian or Portuguese deadstock. A minimal part of our col- lection is made from GOTS certified cotton or Tencel fibers, where deadstock is not available to us yet. Within a few seasons, our goal is to use 100% deadstock fabrics for our collections.

Our use of deadstock fabrics as an ethos, challenges me to work within the limits of what I can source. This defines the collection but also gives a wide diversity of fabrics within the collection.

Brøgger Diary

INTERVIEW WITH JULIE BRØGGER

Could you please describe your studio?

Julie Brøgger (JB): Our studio is in the portobello area in London, just by the north end of the portobello road market.

The studio is under a motorway, so we can hear the faint noise from the cars above. We’ve all agreed it sounds like waves. It’s a quite basic concrete room but a good empty canvas to create. All the neighbors are artists and creatives so there is a great atmosphere.

How would the daily routine look like at your studio?

JB: No day is really the same. It all depends on where we are in the process. At the moment we are in the middle of new development for AW21, and that means pattern cutting, toiling and testing materials, shapes and techniques.

Do you have a guilty pleasure (snack, music, etc)? 

JB: We listen to an awful lot of true crime podcasts in the studio. Every time a new person starts we have to warn them a bit… but it is great for focus!

What has happened with your work routines during the pandemic?

JB: London was in a very strict lockdown with curfews and restrictions for almost 6 months. I live 10min away so I could walk there, but I was on my own for months. Just me and my dog. It was a big change from a usually busy studio.

How do you get inspired at the moment?

JB: It is definitely more internet based than normally

What’s usually the starting point of your design process?

JB: Museum and art gallery visits, and markets. Like the portobello road market close to the studio.

arv Diary

INTERVIEW WITH ARV

What is the most important knowledge you have gained as a designer/brand so far in 2020?

Maikel Tawadros (MT): Patience. Things take time. You can create something unbelievably cool, but that doesn’t ensure instant success. I also learned that having a strong vision makes your story much easier to communicate with your end consumer and while doing that, why not make the process as sustainable as possible? In the end, it’s the consumer who decides if you survive or not. Last but not least, the most important thing is to follow your heart, even though it’s a journey for which you don’t have a map.

What can the Magasin Du Nord Fashion Prize do for you if you win in 2020?

MT: Winning the Magasin du Nord Fashion Prize would mean the world to me. It would allow the opportunity for me to develop my collections/drops by adding more sustainable styles, and explore more sustainable fabrics and production methods.

It would also mean recognition of many years of hard work, and financial freedom for a long period of time.

Astrid Andersen Diary

INTERVIEW WITH ASTRID ANDERSEN

Could you please describe your studio?

Astrid Andersen (AA): My studio is located on Jagtvej 19, the front room is our flagship store/showroom that is open Saturdays only. The rest of the studio works as our office and workshop. We create most of our sampling in house around the shows and it’s a space that represents all processes of a design business from ideas to product to sales. I love this space a lot, its my second home and I have been here for 10 years now which is also very special to me.

 

How would the daily routine look like at your studio?

AA: It depends very much on the season – sometimes its very production focused which would mean a lot of time at the computer only, but right now we are working on the next show in February so we are working on our mood boards, fabrics and sampling the first silhouettes.

 

Do you have a guilty pleasure (snack, music, etc)?

AA: Each season I feel like a new guilty pleasure emerges whether its romkugler* from the local bakery or Justin Bieber it somehow finds its way in.

What has happened with your work routines during the pandemic?

AA: I had a lot of time alone in the studio and it reminded me a lot of when I started the brand and it was just me 24/7 in here and in some way reconnecting with that passion and mindset is very healthy in our industry.

 

How do you get inspired at the moment?

AA: At the moment Im very driven by having reconnected with my own creativity and reasons for starting a brand – being less inside the insustry and breaking free from the fixes seasons is inspiring.

 

What’s usually the starting point of your design process?

AA: I always start with fabrics and follow the intuitive story they tell.

 

Describe your collection this season in 5 words?

AA: These are the sort of questions that have been inspiring not to have been confronted with for a while  As a creative mind its always slightly stressfull to be given an amount of words to describe something you already feel like is a visual expression. AW20s starting point was a floral couch that my mum bought in her teenage years and exploring the 70s references around that rose printed couch and turning those references into a collection that represent my aesthetic.

Brøgger Diary

INTERVIEW WITH JULIE BRØGGER

Name?

Julie Brøgger

Age?

38

Background?

JB: A Royal Danish Academy of Art alumni and spent the first years of my career working for some of London’s most renowned brands, like JW Anderson, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi and Erdem

Design philosophy?

JB: Functionality is not enough, we also need excitement, pleasure, fun, and yes beauty!

What convinced you to start your own brand?

JB: Working for other brands for years, and learning from great creative directors, I believed I had the right tools to build something new.

What production qualities are found in your designs, and what characterises your products?

JB: High quality conscious production in the UK and EU, all materials are sourced from these regions, minimize our footprint by never shipping materials and production by air. We only work with factories with fair wages and good working conditions.

How do you consider sustainability in your collections?

JB: First and foremost I work with longevity as a core principal. I want the clothes we create to last seasons and years -not just a few months. Longevity is considered in both quality and design, to create longlasting value for both the initial customer but also to resale value.

I always strive to find the most sustainable solution for our raw materials, and work with a minimal waste philosophy. Any potential left over materials are donated to local organizations and schools that repurpose them.

Cecilie Bahnsen Diary

INTERVIEW WITH CECILIE BAHNSEN

What’s usually the starting point of your design process?

Cecilie Bahnsen (CB): I always start with creating the colours and the fabric first. Then I start building the theme and mood of the collection.

Describe your collection this season in 5 words?

CB: Journey, hope, unity, texture, sculpture

Please tell how you’re preparing yourself for the jury presentations?

CB: I am doing the presentation first for my team to get their thoughts and input.

I get very nervous when presenting to a lot of people so it is a good way of practicing.

Is there one jury member you’re particular excited to meet?

CB: Nina. I am so truly grateful for what she is doing for young Danish designers. The prize has already meant so much to me and the brand. I look forward to thanking her in person for thinking of us all with this year’s prize.

Design, sustainability or business – how do you plan to prioritize your efforts? 

CB: I think it all goes hand in hand.

But design and long-lasting quality are always at the heart of everything we do.

What would be the first sentence you say at the presentation?

CB: Not quite sure yet, but working on the presentation for this year’s MDNFP has been so inspiring to see the journey the brand has been on since first entering the prize in 2016. I am sure I will reflect a little on this in my presentation as I am truly touched to see how far we have come.

Maja Brix Diary

INTERVIEW WITH MAJA BRIX

What’s usually the starting point of your design process? 

Maja Brix (MB): A good reason

 

Describe your collection this season in 5 words? 

MB: I don’t do seasons but the sum of all the designs I have released, forms a collection that is: Simple considered raw modern elegance

 

Please tell how you’re preparing yourself for the jury presentations? 

MB: I have set myself some goals for what I should achieve on a practical level. That has settled and now spending a lot of time putting the right words on what I do.

Design, sustainability or business – how do you plan to prioritise your efforts?

MB: I’m a designer and that is my focus but in my case, sustainability and business forms the design and vice versa.

 

What would be the first sentence you say at the presentation?

MB: My label is founded on two main values: One is ambitious sustainability, and the other is strong conceptual design

Cecilie Bahnsen Diary

INTERVIEW WITH CECILIE BAHNSEN

Could you please describe your studio?

Cecilie Bahnsen (CB): My studio is based in Østerbro. It is my second home and where I feel most creative.

How would the daily routine look like at your studio?

CB: I don’t have a daily routine, but my favourite days are when I get to work on the collection and develop new ideas

Do you have a guilty pleasure (snack, music, etc)?

CB: Bows – I somehow always find a way to add them to my designs.

 

 

What has happened with your work routines during the pandemic?

CB: It became much more digital with all meetings and creative processes done online.

I missed seeing my team during this time as a big part of my inspiration comes from the people around me.

How do you get inspired at the moment?

CB: I just had a baby boy so I walk a lot, and think and sketch on the move.

Carcel Diary

INTERVIEW WITH CARCEL 

What’s usually the starting point of your design process? 

Veronica D’Souza (VDS): We currently limit ourselves to work with only two materials, silk and alpaca wool. But it’s incredible how many ways to use these materials. So we look at variations, shapes and techniques, honouring the fact that we can do small quantities made by hand. The last thing we do is colorways. 

Describe your collection this season in 5 words? 

VDS: Understated, every day luxury, handcrafted, versatile

Please tell how you’re preparing yourself for the jury presentations?

VDS: We are presenting a completely new concept, so we are super busy right now finalising it. We are very excited to share it with the jury. Personally, I write down notes, and then I throw them away on the day and improvise on it.

Is there one jury member you’re particular excited to meet?

VDS: Design, sustainability or business – how do you plan to prioritise your efforts?

What would be the first sentence you say at the presentation?

VDS: This year, we are focusing on innovation. We are presenting a new shop concept for sustainable retail in order to minimise waste and showcase seasonless designs in stores. So its a bit of everything, actually!

 

Carcel Diary

INTERVIEW WITH CARCEL 

Could you please describe your studio?

Veronica D’Souza (VDS): Our studio is both a Studio Shop and our creative space. Its in central Vesterbro and an old community gallery. We think of it as a community space where we can both interact with customers, have events and develop designs and ideas. A place to meet and be. We also have a mattress in the basement for late nights…

How would the daily routine look like at your studio? 

VDS: We are a very small team but very global, which means that we are in three timezones to work daily with our production teams in Thailand and Peru. The day starts with Thailand, then Europe, and Peru in the afternoon and evenings:).

Often a day goes by with meetings, talks with our production teams and mostly we are working some new big project that we are sprinting towards.   

 

Do you have a guilty pleasure (snack, music, etc)?

VDS: A dip in the cold water before work and then lots of coffee.

What has happened with your work routines during the pandemic?

VDS: They still hold. We’ve always had a very flexible work environment, so working from home works well for us.

How do you get inspired at the moment?

VDS: By looking at the world around us and wondering how we can contribute positively to it. And then through music.

Brøgger Diary

INTERVIEW WITH JULIE BRØGGER

Describe your collection this season in 5 words?

Julie Brøgger (JB): An exploration of female power and construction.

Please tell how you’re preparing yourself for the jury presentations?

JB: It is a great opportunity to present Brøgger to such a strong jury. Preparing for a presentation like this gives the opportunity to evaluate the business and brand in depth witch is not usually a priority in a busy schedule.

Is there one jury member you’re particular excited to meet?

JB: Rebekka Bay, I have great respect for what she has achieved with commercial brands, always with great creative integrity.

Design, sustainability or business – how do you plan to prioritise your efforts? 

JB: They all go hand in hand really. Brøgger is a design and quality led brand so that is always a priority. And it that lies longevity of the product, something I believe is the cornerstone of sustainable luxury fashion.

Protecting and developing the business is very important right now, the pandemic has really shown that. No brand is an island, other businesses are reliant on us, so we have a responsibility to prioritise it.

What would be the first sentence you say at the presentation?

JB: Hi, nice to meet you, let me tell you what Brøgger is all about!

Cecilie Bahnsen Diary

INTERVIEW WITH CECILIE BAHNSEN

Name? 

Cecilie Bahnsen

Age? 

CB: 34 years old

Background?

CB: I grew up in a small city just north of Copenhagen, surrounded by both nature and the pulse of the city. My grandmother was my first introduction to style and crafts. She was such a beautiful and stylish lady. She taught me to hand embroider, crochet and knit. She used to make the most beautiful dresses for my sister and I.

As a child I initially joined the local school however I felt it was way too big and the teachers and other children didn’t quite understand that I was more fascinated with drawings and art than mathematics and languages. After 4 years I transitioned to what the Danish refer to as ‘a little school’ and finally found some of the best friends and inspiration I have ever had.

At the age of 12 I did my first internship or work experience for a week at the Danish Design School and fell in love. From that moment I knew I wanted to study fashion. Seeing that you could fill your life with drawings, beautiful fabric and design was something I felt was too incredible not to pursue.

I started my BA in fashion design at Denmark’s design School in Copenhagen in 2005, graduating in 2007 before receiving an MA degree from London’s Royal College of Art in 2010. Whilst studying, I worked in the design teams at the likes of Erdem and John Galliano.

Design philosophy?

CB: Cecilie Bahnsen is a Danish womenswear label that offers an unexpected and timeless expression of modern femininity. Drawing on a rich history of design quality, Cecilie Bahnsen combines sculptural silhouettes with couture techniques, reinterpreting this with a modern approach.

Each season we evolve the brand’s DNA, it is never about chasing trends, it is about creating a universe of its own, out of time. During this creative process the signature silhouettes have naturally evolved to key pieces in our collection, beautifully showcasing the unique and delicate fabrics.

We have also started to develop a lower waste model, being considered about how many units we produce and to ensure every metre of fabric is utilised.

 

What convinced you to start your own brand?

CB: Ever since I was a child, it has always been my dream to start my own brand, but I also knew that it was important to learn and gain as much knowledge as possible beforehand. Running a fashion brand is not just designing it is so much more complex. My experiences living in London and Paris taught me so much about what it takes to establish yourself as a designer, it also gave me so much inspiration and passion for design and quality.

When it came to choosing the base for my brand it has always been Denmark and Copenhagen, it is my home and I love the pace and design tradition.

Maja Brix Diary

INTERVIEW WITH MAJA BRIX

Could you please describe your studio?

Maja Brix (MB): At the moment my company is split in two places. My sewing studio and my Maja Brix Store at Etage Projects. One is a very vibrant energetic space full of patterns, samples and fabric waiting to be connected and brought to life. The other frames the product and allows me to project the core of the brand

 

How would the daily routine look like at your studio?

MB:  I’m not a very linear person and don’t have routines. The only thing that comes close, starts outside the studio, is my morning dip in the harbour. 

 

Do you have a guilty pleasure (snack, music, etc)?

MB: In general I don’t feel particularly guilty about things that gives me pleasure:-)

 

What has happened with your work routines during the pandemic?

MB: I’m working more from home

 

How do you get inspired at the moment?

MB: I’m very interested in spiritual functionality of clothing. Both In a ceremonial context but also privately. How it can help us to heal, connect or strengthen. This is something I have worked with for a long time but became even more present in my work trough the pandemic.